Mona’s Legacy

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Mona’s husband Herbert remarried and went on to a distinguished career as a Supreme Court Judge in Vancouver. He died in 1957 after a long illness. At that time, his son Archie was living New Westminster, BC.

During the Second World War, Mona’s youngest son Phil flew 39 missions over France and Germany and earned a Distinguished Flying Cross. After the war, he returned to Vancouver and became a broadcaster and sports writer there. He also became a world-class bridge player. He died in 2012, leaving a wife, two daughters and a son, two stepchildren and five grandchildren.

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This concludes the story about Mona and her family. Please stay tuned for the story of Archie and Corrie’s youngest child, Phyllis, who outlived the rest of the family by nearly two decades.
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Image: Photo of Mona Natalie Knight, circa 1925, courtesy of Mary Elizabeth Clark, Cobourg, Ontario, 8 August 2014.

The Accident

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Three years after Mona’s singing performance for the Governor-General and his wife, tragedy struck. On a Saturday night during the Christmas holidays, Mona was driving home when her car hit a patch of ice. It spun around and crashed into a taxi. Mona was thrown against the steering wheel and died from her injuries.

Left behind were her husband Herbert and three children: Archie (17), Barbara (15) and Philip (9).

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Mona’s Wedding

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December 27th, 1911. When Cyril’s sister Mona married an up-and-coming lawyer named Herbert Wood, two ministers conducted the service. Both were long-time friends of the Knight family. One was Rev. Malcolm MacGillvray and the other was Rev. Donald Gordon, principal of Queen’s University.

The wedding took place at Christmas time. Swarms of friends and family descended on Kingston to celebrate the event.  During the ceremony, chimes pealed from the tower of Chalmers Church.

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AP Knight: Alice Street

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Archie and Cordelia had five children: Freddie (14), Muriel (13), Cyril (11), Mona (8) and Phyllis (2), and before long, Cordelia’s mother would also be living with them.

That was too many people for the little house on William Street, so in 1891 the family moved to a larger one. It was beautifully located between the university and the lakeshore on a curving road (Alice Street) that would later be called Queen’s Crescent.

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